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Our Family Is Crazy
Honoring Native Alaskan

Culture
By: Avamere
Date: November 18, 2021

November is Native American Heritage Month, honoring significant contributions the Indigenous people of the Americas made to the establishment and growth of the United States.

In recognition of this observance, Wendde Kneram joined the People of Avamere Pod to share her experience in advocating for cultural sensitivity and communication for Alaskan Natives.

Wendde, occupational therapist (OTR/L) and Director of Rehab with Infinity Rehab, a senior therapy organization part of the Avamere Family of Companies, led this project in 2019 as part of the Leadership Academy, one of Infinity Rehab’s professional development programs.

She titled her project Running in Like a Bear.

“I would rush into the room as we often do as therapists,” Wendde said. She would get right into the session, asking the patient how they’re doing, about their home, and who they live with.

After one session, a family member took Wendde aside and explained that eye contact was considered disrespectful.

“I realized then that I wasn’t aware enough of the Alaskan culture and how it was affecting my approach, my relationship with those residents,” Wendde shared.

Follow her journey and how this work on cultural sensitivity benefits the Native Alaskans and Infinity Rehab therapists serving them.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

LISTEN NOW


Honoring Native Alaskan Culture

By: Avamere
Date: November 18, 2021


November is Native American Heritage Month, honoring significant contributions the Indigenous people of the Americas made to the establishment and growth of the United States.

In recognition of this observance, Wendde Kneram joined the People of Avamere Pod to share her experience in advocating for cultural sensitivity and communication for Alaskan Natives.

Wendde, occupational therapist (OTR/L) and Director of Rehab with Infinity Rehab, a senior therapy organization part of the Avamere Family of Companies, led this project in 2019 as part of the Leadership Academy, one of Infinity Rehab’s professional development programs.

She titled her project Running in Like a Bear.

“I would rush into the room as we often do as therapists,” Wendde said. She would get right into the session, asking the patient how they’re doing, about their home, and who they live with.

After one session, a family member took Wendde aside and explained that eye contact was considered disrespectful.

“I realized then that I wasn’t aware enough of the Alaskan culture and how it was affecting my approach, my relationship with those residents,” Wendde shared.

Follow her journey and how this work on cultural sensitivity benefits the Native Alaskans and Infinity Rehab therapists serving them.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

LISTEN NOW

© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
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© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies