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Our Family Is Crazy
A Message from Derek

12.9.21
By: Derek Fenwick
Date: December 9, 2021

Improving How We Work: ONA Survey Insights
By Derek Fenwick, Senior Director of Human Resources

Note: for ease of reading, we have also included this article in a PDF attachment at the end.

We recently conducted our first-ever organizational network analysis (ONA) survey for Infinity Rehab. Today I am excited to share some of the high-level observations from our survey and report back on some of the actions we are taking to advance our business, in light of what we’ve learned.

As a reminder, organizational network analysis is a structured way to visualize how communication, information, and decisions flow through an organization. By better understanding the working relationships among employees that exist – and those that don’t but should – we can better set up our business for success.

Through this process we can better understand how individuals and teams come together at Infinity Rehab to get work done and identify ‘influencers’ in your work life who are critical to your success at work (i.e., your director, supervising therapist, staffing coordinator mentor, etc.). The ONA survey process is specifically designed to bring more insight into the formal and informal connections that drive our business.

I am happy to share that our aim to gain new insights into how work gets done at Infinity was a huge success! Thank you to the 591 of you who responded (72% response rate vs. 70% goal) to help us gain these insights that allow us to act. We could not have done any of this without you.

Now on to the results! First, here is one view of what Infinity Rehab “looks like”:

In this picture, each circle or “node” is a person that works at Infinity. The nodes in this view are color-coded by where people work, listed in the key. The size of the node matters – the bigger the node, the more times that person was named as someone another person needs to lean on in their work. Finally, the lines between the nodes or “edges” represent each unique, person-to-person connection that exists.

Ok, let’s pause. You might be thinking – what could this picture of dots and lines possibly tell us? Well, let me tell you! Here are a few initial takeaways from this view:

• Notice the big purple cluster in the middle of the network? That’s the corporate home office team. The centrality to the network suggests that it’s an essential connector to getting work done. In addition, the larger size of many of the nodes suggests that people across the organization depend highly on these individuals to get their job done.
• Now, look around the perimeter. See how the different colors are largely clustered together? This represents how our business in the field is primarily done within the states where we work – for example, Oregon works with Oregon, Washington works with Washington, etc.
• Finally, look at how the different colors and lines around the perimeter are stretched out from the center. This “hub and spoke” appearance, combined with how the colors are clustered together, suggests that right now, our work is generally organized in teams that predominantly work among themselves and are independent of other teams outside the local area where they work.

Here’s the same view, except this time colored by employee job type:

Here you’ll notice our three primary jobs – PT/PTA, OT/OTA, and SLP – are much more intermixed and distributed evenly around the periphery of the network, which is consistent with our understanding of how these people form the core frontline teams that drive our business.

On first review, you might think to yourself – isn’t this a little obvious? On the one hand, the answer is yes, this probably makes sense to many of us who know our business and our company. But keep in mind that these are only two views of more than 50 attributes we have in our data that we can analyze to tackle our business challenges better. More importantly, knowing how we get work done today can help us make new connections where they need to be to better get work done in the future.

For example, here’s one final view:

Here’s what our company currently looks like by Clinical Champion level. Notice how the colors are distributed and – importantly – who appears connected and who does not. Notice how our Level 1s and 0s (those still striving to demonstrate Level 1) are peppered throughout our company. In comparison, our Level 2s are more clustered together in surplus and deficit areas. Finally, our Level 3s are scattered throughout but not directly connected to each other.

Now consider our new mission: To set the standard in rehabilitation for successful aging by delivering the best of science with the art of caring.

Suppose you believe like I do that our Clinical Model is the foundation of how we will set the standard in rehabilitation and thrive in the PDPM environment. In that case, it will be vital that we work together. We can now better see and make the connections that need to be more robust to achieve our mission through our ONA survey. We can better identify and support clinicians at Level 0 to reach Level 1, we can focus on recruiting and developing more Level 2 clinicians in the areas where we need more, and we can make sure our Level 3 clinicians are firmly connected to our quality team and Clinical Academy scholars to form a network of clinical experts that help us monitor and drive our patient outcomes.
Now that this survey is complete, the work has begun to put our insights into action. Here are two examples of ways we’ve already done this:

1) We recently met with our area rehab directors. We provided each of them region-level insights on items including sources of knowledge, energy, support, and innovation throughout their regions, allowing them to start taking action to solve our business challenges in new and unique ways.

2) We have identified nearly 40 influential clinicians who are also part of our BIPOC employee community. Our DEI team is now discussing ways to connect with and build relationships with these individuals in the new year.

These are just two ways we have already put the insights into action, with many more in the works. In the coming weeks, we will continue to use our survey insights to improve how decisions get made and how work gets done at Infinity. Thank you again for participating in this important initiative!


A Message from Derek 12.9.21

By: Derek Fenwick
Date: December 9, 2021


Improving How We Work: ONA Survey Insights
By Derek Fenwick, Senior Director of Human Resources

Note: for ease of reading, we have also included this article in a PDF attachment at the end.

We recently conducted our first-ever organizational network analysis (ONA) survey for Infinity Rehab. Today I am excited to share some of the high-level observations from our survey and report back on some of the actions we are taking to advance our business, in light of what we’ve learned.

As a reminder, organizational network analysis is a structured way to visualize how communication, information, and decisions flow through an organization. By better understanding the working relationships among employees that exist – and those that don’t but should – we can better set up our business for success.

Through this process we can better understand how individuals and teams come together at Infinity Rehab to get work done and identify ‘influencers’ in your work life who are critical to your success at work (i.e., your director, supervising therapist, staffing coordinator mentor, etc.). The ONA survey process is specifically designed to bring more insight into the formal and informal connections that drive our business.

I am happy to share that our aim to gain new insights into how work gets done at Infinity was a huge success! Thank you to the 591 of you who responded (72% response rate vs. 70% goal) to help us gain these insights that allow us to act. We could not have done any of this without you.

Now on to the results! First, here is one view of what Infinity Rehab “looks like”:

In this picture, each circle or “node” is a person that works at Infinity. The nodes in this view are color-coded by where people work, listed in the key. The size of the node matters – the bigger the node, the more times that person was named as someone another person needs to lean on in their work. Finally, the lines between the nodes or “edges” represent each unique, person-to-person connection that exists.

Ok, let’s pause. You might be thinking – what could this picture of dots and lines possibly tell us? Well, let me tell you! Here are a few initial takeaways from this view:

• Notice the big purple cluster in the middle of the network? That’s the corporate home office team. The centrality to the network suggests that it’s an essential connector to getting work done. In addition, the larger size of many of the nodes suggests that people across the organization depend highly on these individuals to get their job done.
• Now, look around the perimeter. See how the different colors are largely clustered together? This represents how our business in the field is primarily done within the states where we work – for example, Oregon works with Oregon, Washington works with Washington, etc.
• Finally, look at how the different colors and lines around the perimeter are stretched out from the center. This “hub and spoke” appearance, combined with how the colors are clustered together, suggests that right now, our work is generally organized in teams that predominantly work among themselves and are independent of other teams outside the local area where they work.

Here’s the same view, except this time colored by employee job type:

Here you’ll notice our three primary jobs – PT/PTA, OT/OTA, and SLP – are much more intermixed and distributed evenly around the periphery of the network, which is consistent with our understanding of how these people form the core frontline teams that drive our business.

On first review, you might think to yourself – isn’t this a little obvious? On the one hand, the answer is yes, this probably makes sense to many of us who know our business and our company. But keep in mind that these are only two views of more than 50 attributes we have in our data that we can analyze to tackle our business challenges better. More importantly, knowing how we get work done today can help us make new connections where they need to be to better get work done in the future.

For example, here’s one final view:

Here’s what our company currently looks like by Clinical Champion level. Notice how the colors are distributed and – importantly – who appears connected and who does not. Notice how our Level 1s and 0s (those still striving to demonstrate Level 1) are peppered throughout our company. In comparison, our Level 2s are more clustered together in surplus and deficit areas. Finally, our Level 3s are scattered throughout but not directly connected to each other.

Now consider our new mission: To set the standard in rehabilitation for successful aging by delivering the best of science with the art of caring.

Suppose you believe like I do that our Clinical Model is the foundation of how we will set the standard in rehabilitation and thrive in the PDPM environment. In that case, it will be vital that we work together. We can now better see and make the connections that need to be more robust to achieve our mission through our ONA survey. We can better identify and support clinicians at Level 0 to reach Level 1, we can focus on recruiting and developing more Level 2 clinicians in the areas where we need more, and we can make sure our Level 3 clinicians are firmly connected to our quality team and Clinical Academy scholars to form a network of clinical experts that help us monitor and drive our patient outcomes.
Now that this survey is complete, the work has begun to put our insights into action. Here are two examples of ways we’ve already done this:

1) We recently met with our area rehab directors. We provided each of them region-level insights on items including sources of knowledge, energy, support, and innovation throughout their regions, allowing them to start taking action to solve our business challenges in new and unique ways.

2) We have identified nearly 40 influential clinicians who are also part of our BIPOC employee community. Our DEI team is now discussing ways to connect with and build relationships with these individuals in the new year.

These are just two ways we have already put the insights into action, with many more in the works. In the coming weeks, we will continue to use our survey insights to improve how decisions get made and how work gets done at Infinity. Thank you again for participating in this important initiative!

© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
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© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies