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Our Family Is Crazy
SIO: Diversity, Equity, &

Inclusion
By: Byrony Treser & Erin Finke
Date: April 23, 2020

DEI: The Heart of Our SIO: A Focus on Courage

By Byrony Treser & Erin Finke

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.” -Brene Brown

Courage is not about the epic battle scenes we sometimes see in movies. It is not about daring actions only a few could perform. It is not about heroism. Courage is, in fact, deeply personal.  Stemming from the latin root, “cor” meaning heart, courage is all about our own hearts and actions. To live a courageous life is to lean into our vulnerabilities, to be humble, and to act with bravery. Inclusive leadership requires courage across three levels, namely within ourselves, with others, and with the system.

Courage and vulnerability go hand in hand and are two of the hardest things to show to others.  Common conventional thought has been that we need to hide the “bad” things about ourselves, to keep our weaknesses suppressed. Living with courage helps us to become the strongest and best version of ourselves. When we acknowledge our limitations in a real and personal way, we take risks and are vulnerable. This opens us up to the possibilities for greater growth and potential. Leading with courage does the same for organizations and societies.

Inclusive leaders demonstrate courage in two ways.

First, inclusive leaders display humility by acknowledging their personal limitations as well as their strengths. Some leaders find it difficult to admit they don’t have all the answers or that they are not perfect, but inclusive leaders seek the advice and experience of others to overcome these weaknesses, creating a greater whole.  Humility also means acknowledging when mistakes are made because we can and will misstep. Course correction requires the humility to acknowledge that a mistake was made.

Secondly, inclusive leaders challenge conventional attitudes, processes, and the status quo. Even if they are afraid or their recommendations are politically or culturally unpopular, they speak up and forge forward for the greater good to create a more just, equitable, and inclusive environment. If humility is the internal work of a courageous life, bravery is what is necessary to be courageous with others and with systems and organizations. Bravery is taking action and steps to hold others accountable to their behaviors and actions.

Courageous leaders build inclusivity by engaging in the following practices:

  • Acknowledges personal limitations and weakness
  • Seeks the contributions of others to overcome personal limitations
  • Admits mistakes when made
  • Approach diversity and inclusion wholeheartedly
  • Challenges entrenched organizational attitudes and practices that promote homogeneity
  • Holds others to account for non-inclusive behaviors

The path to inclusivity is hard, and there will be challenges and mistakes made. The end result is a team and workplace where everyone is valued, where people bring their best and most authentic selves to work, and growth and potential are boundless.


SIO: Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion

By: Byrony Treser & Erin Finke
Date: April 23, 2020


DEI: The Heart of Our SIO: A Focus on Courage

By Byrony Treser & Erin Finke

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.” -Brene Brown

Courage is not about the epic battle scenes we sometimes see in movies. It is not about daring actions only a few could perform. It is not about heroism. Courage is, in fact, deeply personal.  Stemming from the latin root, “cor” meaning heart, courage is all about our own hearts and actions. To live a courageous life is to lean into our vulnerabilities, to be humble, and to act with bravery. Inclusive leadership requires courage across three levels, namely within ourselves, with others, and with the system.

Courage and vulnerability go hand in hand and are two of the hardest things to show to others.  Common conventional thought has been that we need to hide the “bad” things about ourselves, to keep our weaknesses suppressed. Living with courage helps us to become the strongest and best version of ourselves. When we acknowledge our limitations in a real and personal way, we take risks and are vulnerable. This opens us up to the possibilities for greater growth and potential. Leading with courage does the same for organizations and societies.

Inclusive leaders demonstrate courage in two ways.

First, inclusive leaders display humility by acknowledging their personal limitations as well as their strengths. Some leaders find it difficult to admit they don’t have all the answers or that they are not perfect, but inclusive leaders seek the advice and experience of others to overcome these weaknesses, creating a greater whole.  Humility also means acknowledging when mistakes are made because we can and will misstep. Course correction requires the humility to acknowledge that a mistake was made.

Secondly, inclusive leaders challenge conventional attitudes, processes, and the status quo. Even if they are afraid or their recommendations are politically or culturally unpopular, they speak up and forge forward for the greater good to create a more just, equitable, and inclusive environment. If humility is the internal work of a courageous life, bravery is what is necessary to be courageous with others and with systems and organizations. Bravery is taking action and steps to hold others accountable to their behaviors and actions.

Courageous leaders build inclusivity by engaging in the following practices:

  • Acknowledges personal limitations and weakness
  • Seeks the contributions of others to overcome personal limitations
  • Admits mistakes when made
  • Approach diversity and inclusion wholeheartedly
  • Challenges entrenched organizational attitudes and practices that promote homogeneity
  • Holds others to account for non-inclusive behaviors

The path to inclusivity is hard, and there will be challenges and mistakes made. The end result is a team and workplace where everyone is valued, where people bring their best and most authentic selves to work, and growth and potential are boundless.

© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
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© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies