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Our Family Is Crazy
SIO: Diversity, Equity, &

Inclusion
By: Byrony Treser & Erin Finke
Date: February 27, 2020

DEI: The Heart of Our SIO: A Focus on Commitment

By Erin Finke and Byrony Treser

As the final countdown to midnight begins, excitement ripples through the gathering space and then “happy new year” choruses ring out. There is something renewing about new year celebrations as people set forth resolutions for achieving a goal. Maybe it is a fitness goal, or the planning of a trip, or achieving a financial success, or deepening a relationship. The energy and hope of these goals is magnetic and dynamic.

For some people, they are able to take these dreams and resolutions and turn them into reality. However, for other people, as the weeks go by, they may give up on their goals or reduce the magnitude, and often within a few months, these wonderful aspirations and dreams have fallen by the wayside.

What makes the difference between achieving one’s goals or not? How do we turn dreams and resolutions into reality? As clinicians, we are well-versed in helping our patients achieve their goals by committing to a plan, asking for accountability, and prioritizing time, energy, and resources. Achieving success with our own goals is no different.

What does setting a new year’s resolution or achieving goals have to do with diversity, equity, and inclusion? Becoming an inclusive leader and living out the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion also requires a plan and accountability. Commitment to DEI comes from a deeply rooted personal believe in the value of DEI and a sense of fair play. This comes from a combination of intellect (belief in the outcomes) and emotion (sense of fair play and caring for people as individuals). Inclusive leaders believe in the potential of people to become whatever they should be able to become, no matter their background, ethnicity, religion, or internal characteristics. Inclusive leaders also act on this belief in everyone’s potential, engaging in the following behaviors:

  1. Treat all team members with fairness and respect
  2. Understand the uniqueness of each team member
  3. Take action to ensure each team member feels connected to the group/organization
  4. Proactively adapt their work practices to meet the needs of others
  5. Treat diversity and inclusion as a priority
  6. Take personal responsibility for outcomes
  7. Clearly and authentically articulate the value of DEI
  8. Allocate resources (time, energy, training) toward improving DEI within the workplace

In our next issue, we will meet Erica Goldsmith, a DOR in Portland, Oregon, and learn how she has built up her team through values assessments and true colors test to create better teamwork and better understanding of where each team member is coming from to achieve produce an inclusive and supportive patient care environment.

 

 


SIO: Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion

By: Byrony Treser & Erin Finke
Date: February 27, 2020


DEI: The Heart of Our SIO: A Focus on Commitment

By Erin Finke and Byrony Treser

As the final countdown to midnight begins, excitement ripples through the gathering space and then “happy new year” choruses ring out. There is something renewing about new year celebrations as people set forth resolutions for achieving a goal. Maybe it is a fitness goal, or the planning of a trip, or achieving a financial success, or deepening a relationship. The energy and hope of these goals is magnetic and dynamic.

For some people, they are able to take these dreams and resolutions and turn them into reality. However, for other people, as the weeks go by, they may give up on their goals or reduce the magnitude, and often within a few months, these wonderful aspirations and dreams have fallen by the wayside.

What makes the difference between achieving one’s goals or not? How do we turn dreams and resolutions into reality? As clinicians, we are well-versed in helping our patients achieve their goals by committing to a plan, asking for accountability, and prioritizing time, energy, and resources. Achieving success with our own goals is no different.

What does setting a new year’s resolution or achieving goals have to do with diversity, equity, and inclusion? Becoming an inclusive leader and living out the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion also requires a plan and accountability. Commitment to DEI comes from a deeply rooted personal believe in the value of DEI and a sense of fair play. This comes from a combination of intellect (belief in the outcomes) and emotion (sense of fair play and caring for people as individuals). Inclusive leaders believe in the potential of people to become whatever they should be able to become, no matter their background, ethnicity, religion, or internal characteristics. Inclusive leaders also act on this belief in everyone’s potential, engaging in the following behaviors:

  1. Treat all team members with fairness and respect
  2. Understand the uniqueness of each team member
  3. Take action to ensure each team member feels connected to the group/organization
  4. Proactively adapt their work practices to meet the needs of others
  5. Treat diversity and inclusion as a priority
  6. Take personal responsibility for outcomes
  7. Clearly and authentically articulate the value of DEI
  8. Allocate resources (time, energy, training) toward improving DEI within the workplace

In our next issue, we will meet Erica Goldsmith, a DOR in Portland, Oregon, and learn how she has built up her team through values assessments and true colors test to create better teamwork and better understanding of where each team member is coming from to achieve produce an inclusive and supportive patient care environment.

 

 

© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
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© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies