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Our Family Is Crazy
Listening to You,

Part 4
By: Holly Winick
Date: November 25, 2020

Listening to You: Part 4

This is the fourth installment of information from the employee survey. Please refer to recent Insiders for additional survey findings if you missed them!

Let’s look at several employee comments today from the annual survey.

Infinity does not match retirement contribution anymore. I have worked for over 5 years and have had little to no raises. Incentive to work for this company is minimal.

Infinity has always made the 401(k) match contributions and continues to do so. In 2017, the match was reduced but was still made. It is unclear why one would have this perception.

Wage changes are considered every year. There are some reasons a raise may not be provided, such as being at the high end of the wage scale for that particular position or performance that doesn’t warrant a wage increase. We wish we could provide higher wages increases. We are transparent in sharing the financial impact we face from federal and state policies for reimbursement.

Working for over five years at full-time (or reaching 10,400 hours of work) results in higher PTO, a generous reduction of medical insurance costs, and additional professional benefits. We value and appreciate those of you who have committed your career to Infinity.

Infinity does not encourage therapist autonomy and they focus on a person’s condition instead of the whole person.

Using PT as an example, the Board of Directors of the American Physical Therapy Association has defined autonomous physical therapist practice as: “independent, self-determined professional judgment and action. Physical therapists have the capability, ability, and responsibility to exercise professional judgment within their scope of practice, and to professionally act on that judgment.”

Two primary responsibilities of autonomous practice for any discipline are:

  • demonstrating professionalism
  • use of evidence-based practice

The standards of care of defined in the Infinity Rehab clinical model are designed to ensure that patients consistently receive the benefit of best-evidence care. Doing so requires a thorough understanding of the whole person; this includes the patient’s condition and the context of their problem defined by their personal and environmental factors. All these things must be considered in order to be successful in ensuring the patient receives the best care that we know to do based on our clinical science.

Professional autonomy includes control over the decisions and procedures related to one’s work. Infinity Rehab’s clinical model of professional autonomy extends well beyond the professional-patient relationship and originates in social and political relationships within the society.

 

 

I love that management is made up largely of therapists that know the industry well and have spent time in the trenches. I feel like they take time to know me and I am not just a number.

So, just who are these people in management at Infinity Rehab? Here are two of our leaders with their reflections on memorable patient experiences.

Patty Scheets, PT DPT NCS, Vice President, Quality and Clinical Outcomes

I decided I wanted to be a physical therapist when I was 9. I’ve often marveled at how lucky I am that the poorly-informed decision of my 9-year-old self turned out to be a perfect fit for me. In my view, being a PT is the perfect blend of thinking and doing.

A few years ago, I had two very different patient experiences that made me grateful for all my experiences prior because they helped me be effective in both cases. One was a patient with an inner ear disorder who had given up many of the things he wanted to do in life due to dizziness. There was nothing remarkable about his case; his problem was very straight forward, and he was easy for me to treat. But his quality of life was so improved that he practically took out an ad proclaiming how wonderful his care was!

The second case was a patient who had significant low back pain related to spinal stenosis. One day he came in, and just like each visit before, we could reduce his pain through movement and positioning, but the improvements weren’t lasting. I had a conversation with his physician about him seeing the patient the following Monday, and we had a plan for moving forward. But things just didn’t feel right. I double and triple checked his vitals, and there was nothing extraordinary, so I explained that we were going to the ED based solely on an inkling I had. Two weeks later he came by our office to see me with a happy wife and a beautiful bouquet of roses. As it turned out, he was having an acute MI and within an hour of me taking him to the ED, he was having a stent placed.

I’m so grateful for all of the people who mentored me, course work, and time in practice that helped me know what to do in both of these situations. For me they reflect how our careers are a journey with each past experience bringing something to the current situation.

Cindy Lech, PT, CHCR, Director of Talent Acquisition

I treated as a PT for 12 years, and there are definitely patients that made an impact on me. There was an elderly man who had an above knee amputation from an accident many years ago. He admitted to our community after a hospitalization and had an ulcer on his heel and contracted gastrocnemius. We discovered that he’d lost so much weight since his hospitalization that his prosthesis didn’t fit. His primary care doctor refused to write an order for new prosthesis, saying his age and condition didn’t warrant it. We found him a new doctor, got the order, fit him for a new prothesis, and he was able to return home independently. He was a very intelligent, very introverted, quirky man who loved to fix old watches and clocks. I was so happy to see him be able to return to his hobbies in the comfort of his home. It was quite a success story!

 


Listening to You, Part 4

By: Holly Winick
Date: November 25, 2020


Listening to You: Part 4

This is the fourth installment of information from the employee survey. Please refer to recent Insiders for additional survey findings if you missed them!

Let’s look at several employee comments today from the annual survey.

Infinity does not match retirement contribution anymore. I have worked for over 5 years and have had little to no raises. Incentive to work for this company is minimal.

Infinity has always made the 401(k) match contributions and continues to do so. In 2017, the match was reduced but was still made. It is unclear why one would have this perception.

Wage changes are considered every year. There are some reasons a raise may not be provided, such as being at the high end of the wage scale for that particular position or performance that doesn’t warrant a wage increase. We wish we could provide higher wages increases. We are transparent in sharing the financial impact we face from federal and state policies for reimbursement.

Working for over five years at full-time (or reaching 10,400 hours of work) results in higher PTO, a generous reduction of medical insurance costs, and additional professional benefits. We value and appreciate those of you who have committed your career to Infinity.

Infinity does not encourage therapist autonomy and they focus on a person’s condition instead of the whole person.

Using PT as an example, the Board of Directors of the American Physical Therapy Association has defined autonomous physical therapist practice as: “independent, self-determined professional judgment and action. Physical therapists have the capability, ability, and responsibility to exercise professional judgment within their scope of practice, and to professionally act on that judgment.”

Two primary responsibilities of autonomous practice for any discipline are:

  • demonstrating professionalism
  • use of evidence-based practice

The standards of care of defined in the Infinity Rehab clinical model are designed to ensure that patients consistently receive the benefit of best-evidence care. Doing so requires a thorough understanding of the whole person; this includes the patient’s condition and the context of their problem defined by their personal and environmental factors. All these things must be considered in order to be successful in ensuring the patient receives the best care that we know to do based on our clinical science.

Professional autonomy includes control over the decisions and procedures related to one’s work. Infinity Rehab’s clinical model of professional autonomy extends well beyond the professional-patient relationship and originates in social and political relationships within the society.

 

 

I love that management is made up largely of therapists that know the industry well and have spent time in the trenches. I feel like they take time to know me and I am not just a number.

So, just who are these people in management at Infinity Rehab? Here are two of our leaders with their reflections on memorable patient experiences.

Patty Scheets, PT DPT NCS, Vice President, Quality and Clinical Outcomes

I decided I wanted to be a physical therapist when I was 9. I’ve often marveled at how lucky I am that the poorly-informed decision of my 9-year-old self turned out to be a perfect fit for me. In my view, being a PT is the perfect blend of thinking and doing.

A few years ago, I had two very different patient experiences that made me grateful for all my experiences prior because they helped me be effective in both cases. One was a patient with an inner ear disorder who had given up many of the things he wanted to do in life due to dizziness. There was nothing remarkable about his case; his problem was very straight forward, and he was easy for me to treat. But his quality of life was so improved that he practically took out an ad proclaiming how wonderful his care was!

The second case was a patient who had significant low back pain related to spinal stenosis. One day he came in, and just like each visit before, we could reduce his pain through movement and positioning, but the improvements weren’t lasting. I had a conversation with his physician about him seeing the patient the following Monday, and we had a plan for moving forward. But things just didn’t feel right. I double and triple checked his vitals, and there was nothing extraordinary, so I explained that we were going to the ED based solely on an inkling I had. Two weeks later he came by our office to see me with a happy wife and a beautiful bouquet of roses. As it turned out, he was having an acute MI and within an hour of me taking him to the ED, he was having a stent placed.

I’m so grateful for all of the people who mentored me, course work, and time in practice that helped me know what to do in both of these situations. For me they reflect how our careers are a journey with each past experience bringing something to the current situation.

Cindy Lech, PT, CHCR, Director of Talent Acquisition

I treated as a PT for 12 years, and there are definitely patients that made an impact on me. There was an elderly man who had an above knee amputation from an accident many years ago. He admitted to our community after a hospitalization and had an ulcer on his heel and contracted gastrocnemius. We discovered that he’d lost so much weight since his hospitalization that his prosthesis didn’t fit. His primary care doctor refused to write an order for new prosthesis, saying his age and condition didn’t warrant it. We found him a new doctor, got the order, fit him for a new prothesis, and he was able to return home independently. He was a very intelligent, very introverted, quirky man who loved to fix old watches and clocks. I was so happy to see him be able to return to his hobbies in the comfort of his home. It was quite a success story!

 

© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies
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© 2019 Avamere Family of Companies